Non-Fiction

  • Joseph Anton

    Salman Rushdie

    Image of Joseph Anton: A Memoir

    Recounting nine years of living in protective custody after the Ayatollah Khomeini sentenced him to death, Rushdie’s memoir is befittingly hefty at over 630 pages. About three-quarters of the way into it, the tediousness of his ongoing fight to live freely comes through all too clear.

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  • All Things Glorious and True

    Kat Asharya

    Image of All Things Glorious and True: Love Letters to Pop Culture, New York, Fashion & Other Objects of Affection

    I met Kat back in zine times, when people made friends through trades and letters, and those friends were often a combination of allies, collaborators, and maybe even the cool cousins you might not have had in your given family. As such I distinctly remember getting one of Kat’s zines and going to rent Breathless because she used stills from the film as background art — a quietly expansive moment in my film appreciation history.

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  • The Gentrification of the Mind

    Sarah Schulman

    Image of The Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination

    As with most historical traumas of abuse, the perpetrators — the state, our families, the media, private industry — have generally pretended that the murder and cultural destruction of AIDS, created by their neglect, never took place. They pretend that there was nothing they could have done, and that no survivors or witnesses are walking around today with anything to resolve.

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  • On Writing

    Stephen King

    Image of On Writing: 10th Anniversary Edition: A Memoir of the Craft

    It’s been a while since I read a book focused on writing. Many writing books are useful for thinking about creativity in general or for applying to any type of writing, but this one is geared toward fiction…

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  • You Are Here

    Katharine Harmon

    Image of You Are Here: Personal Geographies and Other Maps of the Imagination

    A curated exploration of “Personal Geographies And Other Maps of the Imagination,” I appropriately read and browsed through this while visiting a city that I used to live in, wandering old neighborhoods, piecing together streets, and layering new experiences over the mental cartographies. There are a few essays and textual maps in this book, but most of it is visuals.

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  • Grace

    Grace Coddington

    Image of Grace: A Memoir

    As someone who first learned of Grace Coddington from her feisty presence in The September Issue, I felt appropriately chided by the introduction where Coddington declares it “the movie that is the only reason anyone has ever heard of me.” That claim is mostly untrue in terms of the fashion world, but then the average person who saw that documentary is unaware of who edits the spreads in fashion magazines.

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  • Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

    Jeanette Winterson

    Image of Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

    I loved Winterson’s first, semi-autobiographical novel Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit when I first read it as a teenager. Her slightly fictionalized Jeanette struggles through her religious upbringing with her crazy adoptive mother and a difficult coming-out experience.

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  • The Long Goodbye

    Meghan O’Rourke

    Image of The Long Goodbye: A memoir

    When I read the excerpt from this book in The New Yorker a couple years ago, I wasn’t particularly drawn to read the whole thing. But a copy showed up in a giveaway pile at work, and I wound up turning to it between library holds. I thought I’d put it aside when something else came along but instead wound up determined to finish, staying up late to get to the end.

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  • Storming the Gates of Paradise

    Rebecca Solnit

    Image of Storming the Gates of Paradise: Landscapes for Politics

    I started reading Storming the Gates of Paradise early last year, but since it’s not a light read, the library wound up wanting it back before I could finish. Only thanks to having added it as my “currently reading” book on Goodreads was my memory jogged enough times to get another copy and finally read the rest.

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  • The Englishman who Posted Himself and Other Curious Objects

    John Tingey

    Image of The Englishman who Posted Himself and Other Curious Objects

    In many ways W. Reginald Bray could be considered a mail art pioneer, as he sent a bevy of interesting items through the post including, as the title reveals, himself — twice! He also posted his dog and various objects with addresses and stamps applied directly to them, as when he traveled to Ireland and dug up a turnip and etched his address into it (the turnip itself didn’t survive to be documented). His experiments seem more inquisitive of the abilities of the Royal Mail than artistic though.

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