Memoir

  • A Field Guide to Getting Lost

    Rebecca Solnit

    Image of A Field Guide to Getting Lost

    I last read this book nearly six and a half years ago; when my friend Eleanor brought it up recently to share a quote from it someone had passed on to her, it felt like perfect time for a re-read. In those six odd years, I’ve read several of Solnit’s books and have come to appreciate her particular way of getting at a subject, where bits and pieces of anecdotes and research fuse together into a nuanced perspective.

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  • The Faraway Nearby

    Rebecca Solnit

    Image of The Faraway Nearby (Ala Notable Books for Adults)

    I expect even some of the most stalwart of Solnit’s fans would not consider this her best book, as it seems a bit scattered, though it’s similar in general feel to A Field Guide to Getting Lost. Its “Russian-doll” structure functions less like burrowing deeper into the complexities of a difficult period of her life and more like the tide retreating away from solid ground only to flow back in. Yet for me the timing of this book was uncanny, as I kept finding topical moments throughout.

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  • Joseph Anton

    Salman Rushdie

    Image of Joseph Anton: A Memoir

    Recounting nine years of living in protective custody after the Ayatollah Khomeini sentenced him to death, Rushdie’s memoir is befittingly hefty at over 630 pages. About three-quarters of the way into it, the tediousness of his ongoing fight to live freely comes through all too clear.

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  • The Gentrification of the Mind

    Sarah Schulman

    Image of The Gentrification of the Mind: Witness to a Lost Imagination

    As with most historical traumas of abuse, the perpetrators — the state, our families, the media, private industry — have generally pretended that the murder and cultural destruction of AIDS, created by their neglect, never took place. They pretend that there was nothing they could have done, and that no survivors or witnesses are walking around today with anything to resolve.

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  • On Writing

    Stephen King

    Image of On Writing: 10th Anniversary Edition: A Memoir of the Craft

    It’s been a while since I read a book focused on writing. Many writing books are useful for thinking about creativity in general or for applying to any type of writing, but this one is geared toward fiction…

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  • Grace

    Grace Coddington

    Image of Grace: A Memoir

    As someone who first learned of Grace Coddington from her feisty presence in The September Issue, I felt appropriately chided by the introduction where Coddington declares it “the movie that is the only reason anyone has ever heard of me.” That claim is mostly untrue in terms of the fashion world, but then the average person who saw that documentary is unaware of who edits the spreads in fashion magazines.

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  • Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

    Jeanette Winterson

    Image of Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

    I loved Winterson’s first, semi-autobiographical novel Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit when I first read it as a teenager. Her slightly fictionalized Jeanette struggles through her religious upbringing with her crazy adoptive mother and a difficult coming-out experience.

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  • The Long Goodbye

    Meghan O’Rourke

    Image of The Long Goodbye: A memoir

    When I read the excerpt from this book in The New Yorker a couple years ago, I wasn’t particularly drawn to read the whole thing. But a copy showed up in a giveaway pile at work, and I wound up turning to it between library holds. I thought I’d put it aside when something else came along but instead wound up determined to finish, staying up late to get to the end.

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  • Calling Dr. Laura

    Nicole Georges

    Image of Calling Dr. Laura: A Graphic Memoir

    It’s that time of year when I tend to think of Portland and my time living there — now five years distant; so it was fitting that Nicole’s new book came out right now. I read it in one snowy evening, finding many old familiars of that city and of the people. Nicole is someone I knew there, through mutual friends as well as crossing paths at the IPRC, but not incredibly well.

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  • Wild

    Cheryl Strayed

    Image of Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

    Like many people, I first came across Cheryl Strayed through her column Dear Sugar on the Rumpus, though her identity was still a secret at that point. Sugar’s advice is so unsparingly raw, honest, and compassionate — I think I read all the entries the first time I came across one of them.

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