Fiction

  • Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

    Haruki Murakami

    I might have skipped this Murakami novel, underwhelmed by the past few, but then Patti Smith reviewed it for The New York Times, sparking some interest with this description:

    ...more
  • A Book of Common Prayer

    Joan Didion

    In the realm of novels by Joan Didion, Play It as It Lays seems to be the crowd favorite, but after reading that one I didn’t feel incredibly compelled to read another of hers. I suppose I needed one to appear at the right time, and so it did when I was buying some books for vacation and...more

  • Too Much Happiness

    Alice Munro

    I’ve read so many of Alice Munro’s stories, some of which were pre-booklog and some that I didn’t bother to write up at the time. This collection feels like a particularly strong batch of stories, if a bit more vicious overall, compared to other collections — so much death and injury!

    The highlight is defi...more

  • The Sound of Things Falling

    Juan Gabriel Vásquez

    Jolted by memories triggered by an escaped hippopotamus from the abandoned zoo that was once owned by the drug lord Pablo Escobar, a man recollects on a series of events that altered his life to such a traumatic degree that he struggled to cope years later. Though the story is focused on this law professor named Antonio who unwittingly started...more

  • The Luminaries

    Eleanor Catton

    Earlier this year, I stacked my library holds with popular books from 2013, but I was a bit hesitant to add The Luminaries. I have a pretty narrow threshold for historical fiction, yet clearly people loved it. With Eleanor Catton being the youngest winner of the Man Booker Prize, ultimately my curiosity won out. Though when I...more

  • Can’t and Won’t

    Lydia Davis

    I think what I love about Lydia Davis is how she finds significance and narrative in the banalities of the every day. I know most people consider recounting dreams to be one of the most socially unacceptable things you can do, perhaps just below subway grooming, but rarely do I dislike a dream story. Whether or not you try to...more

  • Dept. of Speculation

    Jenny Offill

    This slim novel could easily be read in a day, but I happened to read part of it on a Saturday and the rest on a Sunday morning, when I woke up far earlier than usual. It was the perfect thing for a quiet morning, the sky still lightening to day. While I’m sure some people would try to call this a lyric essay, as championed in...more

  • Bark

    Lorrie Moore

    I have been under this misguided impression that I’ve read a few things by Lorrie Moore when actually I have read just one novel, a long time ago, during such a hectic period that even my notes conjure up very little to remember it now. While these stories circle around themes of disappointment and regret, there’s still a wry humor...more

  • The Goldfinch

    Donna Tartt

    The Goldfinch has become one of the most talked-about novels I can recall in recent years, especially now, coming off its Pulitzer win. It’s the most successful, post-9/11 fiction where an actual experience of terrorism is portrayed that I’ve read — though since the book suggests that its bombing at the...more

  • The Lowland

    Jhumpa Lahiri

    When I saw this book was coming out last year, I assumed I’d missed a book from Lahiri since her short story collection Unaccustomed Earth that came out in 2008. But this is the first book of hers to be published since then; the meticulousness of it suggests that time was spent...more

Pages