Short Stories

  • How to Breathe Underwater

    Julie Orringer

    I wanted to like this collection more, but there was something missing or it just wasn’t the right time to read it. Maybe the stories are just a little too polished, a little too clean. Like The Mother Garden, all of these stories involve some element of sickness or grief. But unlike that...more

  • The Mother Garden

    Robin Romm

    Elissa was returning this at the library and told me I should read it, so I checked it out. This collection could be subtitled something like”variations on grief,” as all of them involve a core theme of loss, whether imminent or realized. Most of the deaths involve sickness, especially cancer,...more

  • Difficult Loves

    Italo Calvino

    I’d only ever read Calvino’s amazing Invisible Cities, but I wandered into the FICTION C aisle the day I got my NYPL card and grabbed this collection. I guess I’ve always been worried of treading beyond...more

  • Tony Takitani

    Haruki Murakami

    A friend told me about Cloverfield Press a while back — short fiction paired with art and letterpress-printed covers. Since I missed this Murakami story in The New Yorker (it’s only online in a terrible, abbreviated version) and never finished...more

  • Get Down

    Asali Solomon

    This is probably my favorite short story collection that I’ve read all year. I find the collections I enjoy the most are those where all of the stories are rooted in certain commonalities while each one retains a distinctive feel and focus, as if the collection constitutes an exercise in working out all the possibilities of those...more

  • This Life She’s Chosen

    Kirsten Sundberg Lunstrum

    I found it funny when one of the characters in an early story described a play as “very subtle … very oblique” — as it’s a pretty apt description of the stories in this collection. At first I felt annoyed that each one seemed to leave out a key detail I was wanting to know. But either I got used to it or the missing pieces...more

  • The Push Man and other stories

    Yoshihiro Tatsumi

    If I’d paid better attention, I would have waited to read Abandon the Old in Tokyo in order to be properly anal and read the books in sequence. The introduction by Adrian Tomine is both a personal and technical opener to the series and how it came to be, including a note on the di...more

  • Abandon the Old in Tokyo

    Yoshihiro Tatsumi

    I haven’t been keeping up with Adrian Tomine, or the last few issues of Optic Nerve for that matter. So that might be why I also missed hearing about this series of translations of Tatsumi’s work, which Tomine is editing/designing/lettering. This book...more

  • No one belongs here more than you

    Miranda July

    It was a small thing, but it was a thing, and things have a way of either dying or growing, and it wasn’t dying. Years went by. This thing grew, like a child, microscopically, every day. And since they were a team, and all teams want to win, they continuously adjusted their vision to keep its growth invisible. They wordlessly

    ...more
  • Stranger Things Happen

    Kelly Link

    Once again, unable to finish a book before its due date back at the library. Part of it might have been that I liked some of these stories a whole lot better than others. The pseudo-modern-fairy-tale/mythology-retellings weren’t heavy on the clever for me. But I did enjoy the creepier stories, like the librarian in love with a lady...more

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